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Women Managers Oversee Major Brasfield & Gorrie’s Project

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Brasfield & Gorrie has long strived to advance women builders. As Business Alabama reported in a recent story, the construction company is continuing that goal with the two managers of its $280 million Grandview Medical Center project:

Work on the new Grandview Medical Center on U.S. 280 in Birmingham is moving forward more than a decade after the building’s former owner brought construction to a halt. One firm that is back on the job is Brasfield & Gorrie General Contractors. The company has been in business for 50 years, and, like the structure itself, has weathered change since the day of its founding.

HealthSouth Corp. started construction on the hospital in 2002 with a promise to build a state-of-the-art, digital facility. But by 2003, the project, overseen by Brasfield & Gorrie, stalled when HealthSouth faced charges of accounting fraud. HealthSouth later sold the property to the Daniel Corp. Then in 2008, Trinity Medical Center announced plans to purchase the hospital and relocate from its Montclair Road campus in Birmingham. Other area hospitals objected to the move and launched challenges before a state regulatory board and in the courts, until 2013, when the Alabama Supreme Court refused to hear the case. Trinity then closed on the transaction for $37.6 million and selected Brasfield & Gorrie, in partnership with A.G. Gaston, to manage the hospital’s completion.

When construction resumed, one of the first tasks was upgrading and retrofitting equipment such as boilers, chillers, generators and air handling units throughout the hospital, says Senior Project Manager Susan Stabler.

“We spent six months in this retro-commissioning phase,” says Stabler. “What that means is that there were multimillions of dollars of equipment that were put into this building to run all of the mechanical and electrical systems of the building 10 years ago that were only partially run. A lot of it had never been turned on, and then a portion of it worked at very minimum capacities for 10 or 11 years. It all had to be retested, because there had been little maintenance done and little use of it over the last decade.”

To read the entire Business Alabama article, click here.

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